Levine Communications Office

One of America's Premier Public Relations Firms

  • August 2022
    M T W T F S S
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    293031  

Posts Tagged ‘New York Times’

Quick Time Management Tips

Posted by Levine Communications Office on November 5, 2010

We recently received an email from six-time New York Times bestseller Neil Strauss containing some very valuable lessons. Since we found his email extremely helpful, we thought it would be beneficial to share some of these time management tips with all of you as well. Enjoy!

Neil Strauss

The books from which I picked up the following tips include “Getting Things Done” by David Allen; “First Things First” by Stephen Covey; and “No B.S. Time Management For Entrepreneurs” by Dan Kennedy.

1. Know what your time is worth. There’s an easy formula to calculate this: Take your earnings for the year. Divide that number by 1760. The resulting number is roughly what you make hourly in a work week. However, considering that statistically most people work for an average of one-third of a work hour, multiply that number by three. Now you know what your time is really worth. Treat it that way.

2. Make lists. For those of you who don’t keep running lists of the things you need to do, it’s time to start. Get to-do items off your mind and down on paper. Then prioritize them. One way to do so is to mark them as “A” tasks, which must get done right away; B tasks, which must get done that week; and less urgent C tasks, which simply need to get done sometime in the next six months.

3. Link what you do with your time to your longterm goals. With the Internet available as a constant distraction, most of us are constantly busy but not constantly productive. So always ask yourself: “Is what I’m doing right now bringing me any closer to my goals?”

4. Beware of people who suck up your time. Wean them off their dependence on you and teach them to respect your schedule. If they continue to call, text, or distract you, put them in their place politely. Explain, “I’m really busy, so I’m only dealing with things that are urgent do-or-die priorities. If what you need to talk to me about isn’t an emergency, let’s deal with it later in the week.” Handle your priorities first, not theirs. If your door is always open, people will always be walking through it.

5. Turn off the phone while you’re working and do not check your email, so that you aren’t constantly distracted. Most things can wait. Unless your work requires being available by phone and email all day, set yourself one or two specific windows of time during the day when you deal with emails, phone messages, texts, Facebook, and all the rest of the technological innovations that consume your time and energy.

6. Try to do something active and physical every day. Though it takes time, it improves focus, so you can use the time you do have more productively and feel better about yourself. In general, as we discussed in one of the first emails I sent you, the secret to happiness is living a balanced life.

7. In addition, a simple rule that most people have trouble following: Do the most important thing first, not the easiest thing to get it out of the way. There’s a book I haven’t read, but the title illustrates this point nicely: Never Check Email in the Morning.

You only live once and you never know when it’s going to end, so by making sure you get the most out of your time, you’ll also be making sure you get the most out of your life.

Posted in Clients | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »